Waste Responsibilities for Landlords and Tenants

Any waste arising from the maintenance of a property, including demolition, construction and garden waste produced by a builder or contractor is the responsibility of the landlord under the regulations of most local councils.

The majority of councils will not remove this type of waste free of charge, so once a tenant has vacated a property, the landlord will become responsible for any waste or bulky items left by the tenant outside the property.

It is therefore in the best interests of a landlord to dispose of such items as quickly and efficiently as possible as pursuing the tenants for fine reimbursement can be both costly and time consuming.

There are two main options available to landlords when clearing a property for refurbishment or new tenants – skip hire or a man & van service.

Skip hire is usually the best option if you have large quantities of heavy materials such as rubble or soil to get rid of but it can be time consuming to arrange, especially if a permit is required from the council to place the skip on the road. For the best skip hire prices visit www.skipandbin.com where you can instantly compare skip hire prices of hundreds of licensed UK skip companies to find today’s best rates.

With televisions, fridges and freezers being the three most common items landlords need to have removed from their properties, skip hire is often not an option as these items are usually banned from skips. For a fast, efficient and hassle-free man & van service with labour included give AnyJunk a call on 0207 819 9000.

Whatever approach you take to dealing with waste from renovations, building works or in-between tenancies, it is essential that you use a licensed waste carrier to deal with it quickly and legally. You can then discuss any disputes with the tenant once it is removed. This will undoubtedly save you money in the long run!

Content originally provided by UrbanSalesandLettings.co.uk, Advertising your house online and Rightmove.

This entry was written by , posted on Jan 11, 2013 , filed under , . Bookmark the permalink.